Men’s Tea
Strong, sweet, spicy.

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Men’s Tea


The masculine side in all of us suffers of stress, exhaustion and excessive eating which can negatively impact our body regarding power and strength. Balance can be restored by exercise, proper rest and a wholesome diet. We are then able to unfold our full ideas and potential. YOGI TEA® Men's Tea with ginger, roasted chicory, ginseng and chili pepper is a great tasting tea to be enjoyed at any time to help us find balance of our inner masculine and feminine powers. The essence of this tea is: 'Strength'.
ginger*, cardamom*, liquorice*, carob*, cinnamon*, barley malt*, roasted chicory*, peppermint*, fenugreek*, fennel*, mace*, anise*, ginseng root*, astragalus*, turmeric root*, chili pepper*, cinnamon oil*, black pepper*

Ayurvedic information

Ayurvedic information
Reduce
Neutral
Elevate
Vata
50%
Pitta
100%
Kapha
50%

Yoga Pose - Yoga for Purification

Additional Information

* Certified organic

Ingredients

ginger

Ginger

Whether in the Christmas biscuits, as a curry mixture or in lemonade: The bulbous ginger is among the best-known spice plants in the world. For thousands of years, it has been cultivated in the tropical heat of eastern Asia. It gives many of our YOGI TEA®s a fruity-hot and aromatically spicy taste.
cardamom

Cardamom

Cardamom has been one of the most popular spices for thousands of years throughout the entire Asian and Arabian area. Its subtle, sweetish-spicy aroma predestines cardamom for use in many different foods ranging from sharp curries to spicy Christmas biscuits.
liquorice

Liquorice

Liquorice has already been known since ancient times. Its sweetening power is about 50 times stronger than that of sugar. It tastes mild-sweetish and bitter-tart.

Carob

Indigenous to the Mediterranean area and Asia, carob is a plant from the legume family. The long, brown fruit of the carob tree - which grows up to a height of 18 metres - taste sweetish and carry seeds that each weigh precisely 0.197 grams. Due to this special characteristic of nature, carob seeds were used as the measuring unit for diamonds in antiquity.
cinnamon

Cinnamon

Cinnamon is among the most expensive spices in the world and was supposedly already used as a spice in China in 3,000 B.C. Cinnamon is extracted from the bark of the South-Asian cinnamon tree. It has an aromatic-sweetish taste and contains valuable essential oils.
barley malt

Barley malt

Barley belongs to the grass family. It is indigenous to the Middle East and the eastern part of the Balkans. In earlier times, barley malt was the only known sweetener – it tastes pleasantly malty and slightly like caramel.

Chicory (roasted)

The chicory is also known under the name of blueweed because its sky-blue flowers prefer to grow at the wayside. The flowers of the plant from the asteraceae family, which is native to Europe, northwestern Africa and western Asia, open for just one single day. Its roots taste spicy-tart and give herbal tea mixtures a touch of coffee taste – but without the caffeine.
peppermint

Peppermint

First discovered in 1696 and presumably created through the coincidental hybridisation of the water mint and wild mint, peppermint is now one of the most familiar plants in the world. Peppermint is extremely popular throughout the world due to its refreshing aroma. It has a mild, pleasant pungency.

Fenugreek

The highly spicy fenugreek grows in Morocco, India, China, Africa, Australia and Europe. Its German name of Bockshornklee is based on its shape, which reminds people of billy goat horns (Bockshorn). In 795 A.D., Charles the Great ordered the cultivation of fenugreek in the monastery gardens and allowed it to spread throughout Europe as a result.
fennel

Fennel

Fennel belongs to the umbellifer family and has been popular for thousands of years around the globe due to its intensive aroma. It originally came from the Mediterranean region. Its sweetish-spicy taste is slightly reminiscent of anise.

Mace

Mace is the shell of the nutmeg. Whether dried or ground, it has been used as a seasoning for many thousands of years. Its aroma is somewhat more subtle than that of nutmeg. It tastes spicy-warm and is extremely popular especially in the colder season.
anise

Anise

This annual plant thrives in Asia and the southeastern part of the Mediterranean. People have revered its sweetish tasting fruit for thousands of years. In earlier times, anise was sacrificed to the gods. Now it is found in cakes and Christmas biscuits, as well as a delicious spice in many YOGI TEA®s.
ginseng root

Ginseng root

Ginseng was long considered to be the "plant of the kings" since its extremely slow growth made it unaffordable for most people. It sometimes takes up to 170 years until the wild ginseng root - which came from North Korea - is completely ready for harvesting. Its taste is slightly bitter and tart.

Astragalus

The plant called astragalus in the West is known in China under the name of Huang Qi. The literal translation means the "Yellow Emperor" and accordingly reflects the significance of the plant for human beings.
turmeric root

Turmeric root

Turmeric primarily grows in Asia and the Mediterranean region. It belongs to the ginger family and is one of the main components of curry powder. In India, the ginger-like and slightly savoury curcuma root was already one of the most important spices more than 5,000 years ago. It was even considered to be sacred.
chili pepper

Chili pepper

Chili peppers are annual plants of the nightshade family that primarily thrive in sunny countries such as Mexico, India, Thailand and Tanzania. Their natural pungency has made them one of the most popular spice plants in the world.

black pepper

Black pepper

Also called the "king of spices," black pepper is one of the world's most important spices in addition to salt. It originally came from the Indian Malabar Coast and tastes intensive-spicy, ranging from slightly spicy to quite spicy.

Find out more about our herbs and spices...

Men’s Tea

Brewing Suggestions

Pour 250 ml of freshly boiled water over the teabag. Allow to infuse for 5 to 6 minutes - or longer for a stronger flavour.

  • 250 ml 100°C
  • 5-6 Min
  • Enjoy